Tag Archives: Climate Change

Final CFP: How do we do research on climate change?

How do we do research on climate change?
Wednesday 29 January 2014, King’s College London

You are cordially invited to the 2014 Open Meeting of the Climate Change Research Group (CCRG), to be hosted by King’s College London on Wednesday 29 January 2014.
The meeting is open to all academics working within the field of climate and climate change, but is particularly aimed at PhD students, and covers all disciplines within the context of climate change, including social, political and physical science.

The title of the meeting is “How do we do research on climate change?” and will cover issues such as whether our research addresses the same goals and tackles the same climate change agenda. The meeting will include short presentations from postgraduates (focusing on methods used rather than actual findings), as well as a number of short talks and a roundtable discussion with leading academics.

In the first instance, please email Charlie Williams (C.J.R.Williams@reading.ac.uk) for a registration form. You are also warmly invited (and indeed encouraged) to submit an abstract for a short presentation along the above themes. There will be a limited amount of funding for PhD students, to cover registration and travel expenses. If you would like to apply for this, please state your reasons along on your registration form.

Please note that spaces are still available, so the deadline for registrations has been extended to 1 January 2014

Call for Papers: How do we research on climate change?

Climate Change Research Group Open Meeting: How do we do research on climate change?

Wednesday 29 January 2014, King’s College London

You are cordially invited to the 2014 Open Meeting of the Climate Change Research Group (CCRG), to be hosted by King’s College London on Wednesday 29 January 2014.

The meeting is open to all academics working within the field of climate and climate change, but is particularly aimed at PhD students, and covers all disciplines within the context of climate change, including social, political and physical science.

The title of the meeting is “How do we do research on climate change?” and will cover issues such as whether our research addresses the same goals and tackles the same climate change agenda. The meeting will include short presentations from postgraduates (focusing on methods used rather than actual findings), as well as a number of short talks and a roundtable discussion with leading academics.

In the first instance, please email Charlie Williams (C.J.R.Williams@reading.ac.uk) for a registration form. You are also warmly invited (and indeed encouraged) to submit an abstract for a short presentation along the above themes. There will be a limited amount of funding for PhD students, to cover registration and travel expenses. If you would like to apply for this, please state your reasons along on your registration form.

Please note that spaces are limited, so please email as soon as possible and by 1 December 2013 at the latest.

Call for Abstracts: How do we do research on climate change?

Climate Change Research Group Open Meeting

Wednesday 29 January 2014, King’s College London

You are cordially invited to the 2014 Open Meeting of the Climate Change Research Group (CCRG), to be hosted by King’s College London on Wednesday 29 January 2014. The meeting is open to all academics working within the field of climate and climate change, but is particularly aimed at PhD students, and covers all disciplines within the context of climate change, including social, political and physical science.

The title of the meeting is “How do we do research on climate change?” and will cover issues such as whether our research addresses the same goals and tackles the same climate change agenda. The meeting will include short presentations from postgraduates (focusing on methods used rather than actual findings), as well as a number of short talks and a roundtable discussion with leading academics.

In the first instance, please email Charlie Williams (C.J.R.Williams@reading.ac.uk) for a registration form. You are also warmly invited (and indeed encouraged) to submit an abstract for a short presentation along the above themes. There will be a limited amount of funding for PhD students, to cover registration and travel expenses. If you would like to apply for this, please state your reasons along on your registration form.

Please note that spaces are limited, so please email as soon as possible and by 1 December 2013 at the latest.

Influencing Policy on Climate Change

Influencing Policy on Climate Change: an interdisciplinary workshop for early-career researchers. 1st Oct 2013, Cumberland Lodge, Windsor

How does academic research influence policy? What are the obstructions which prevent research from driving policy? How can academics most effectively engage with each other, and with policymakers? Climate change researchers need to know the answers to these questions to maximise the chance that their research has policy impact.

In the run up to the next general election in 2015, the policy landscape is ripe for evidence-based political engagement on important matters like climate change. But with competing claims on policy-makers’ time, and competing claims within academia, how best to get your research heard and have impact? What do policy cycles look like and how can academic research fit into these effectively? And how can researchers between disciplines work more collaboratively and efficiently to this end?

This is a one-day workshop and networking event for postgraduates and early career researchers from any discipline working on climate change issues. The event has a twofold objective; for ECRs to:

•Develop strategies for talking productively about climate change between disciplines (interdisciplinary exchange)

•Learn more about talking to policy makers and influencing policy decisions (policy influence)

Each participant will be expected to give a 1-slide, 2-minute presentation on their research that is accessible to researchers in other disciplines and policy-makers. Participants will hear from key speakers about how to maximise policy impact in government and NGOs, and how to work work more productively together.

Climate change research is too important to be obstructed by disciplinary barriers or poor communication. This workshop offers the space to reflect on how to overcome these problems. For full details including booking please see the website.

Call for papers: Sustainable Transitions

RGS Planning Environment Research Group (PERG) Workshop: 25th – 26th April 2013, Exeter

This spring PERG workshop is designed to bring together those with research interests in the planning and environment field, particularly early career researchers. There is general agreement across the political divide that in the face of the important challenges of climate change and energy security, and the myriad associated economic, social, and political issues entwined with these challenges, there is a need to alter the trajectories of current sociotechnological development.

There is substantial differentiation however in relation to what particular ‘sustainable transitions’ would look like, and what policy frameworks, planning procedures, and political decisions will enable different ‘transitions’ to occur. These are central concerns for the PERG research group. Many different visions of sustainable transitions are discernible in the varied settings of the current policy landscape: in the UK context for example, there appears to be a centralisation of sustainable development policy through planning reforms such as the Planning Act 2008 and the development of National Policy Statement’s (NPS’s) as one example, whereas on the other hand, grassroots, community-led forms of transition such as Transition Towns, offer models based around different Geographical scales, technological choices, forms of public engagement, and actors involved in the transition process.

Themes for the workshop could include (but are not limited to):

• The uneven geographies of transition
• Energy choices and transition pathways
• Planning reform in a carbon constrained world
• Climate change negotiations/Geo-politics of climate change and planning
• Behavioural change and sustainable transitions
• Grassroots and community-led approaches to transition
• Sustainable development, climate change and the political
• STS and materialist approaches to sustainable transitions
• Public engagement and democratic accountability within sustainable transitions
• Household approaches to sustainable transitions
• Planning and sustainable transitions in the context of austerity.

Participants are invited to submit abstracts of no more than 250 words to either Stewart Barr (S.W.Barr@exeter.ac.uk) or Philip Johnstone (P.Johnstone@exeter.ac.uk) no later than February 15th 2013. For more details download the full Call for Papers.