Category Archives: Other Calls for Papers (CFPs)

Final CFP: How do we do research on climate change?

How do we do research on climate change?
Wednesday 29 January 2014, King’s College London

You are cordially invited to the 2014 Open Meeting of the Climate Change Research Group (CCRG), to be hosted by King’s College London on Wednesday 29 January 2014.
The meeting is open to all academics working within the field of climate and climate change, but is particularly aimed at PhD students, and covers all disciplines within the context of climate change, including social, political and physical science.

The title of the meeting is “How do we do research on climate change?” and will cover issues such as whether our research addresses the same goals and tackles the same climate change agenda. The meeting will include short presentations from postgraduates (focusing on methods used rather than actual findings), as well as a number of short talks and a roundtable discussion with leading academics.

In the first instance, please email Charlie Williams (C.J.R.Williams@reading.ac.uk) for a registration form. You are also warmly invited (and indeed encouraged) to submit an abstract for a short presentation along the above themes. There will be a limited amount of funding for PhD students, to cover registration and travel expenses. If you would like to apply for this, please state your reasons along on your registration form.

Please note that spaces are still available, so the deadline for registrations has been extended to 1 January 2014

Citizen CyberScience Summit 2014

London: 20-22 Feb 2014

The summit will be structured as a 3-day event that offers scientists, practitioners, enthusiasts, policy makers and citizen scientists the unique opportunity to meet and discuss citizen science and citizen cyberscience, participate in activities, and develop prototypes for new projects.

The first day (Thursday, 20th February 2014) will focus on the wide range of citizen science activities, exploring the engagement, creativity and participation, outreach of citizen science to the developing world, and the undertaking of citizen science projects in challenging environments (e.g. in a rainforest or the Arctic). We also welcome talks that deal with the growing policy and environmental management implications of citizen science.

For the second day (Friday, 21st February 2014) we are calling for presentations on the technical aspects of citizen science, such as: the need for suitable hardware and software; or panels discussing with citizen scientists about their perceptions, participation and engagement; or a showcase of citizen science projects. Based upon the success of this event in 2012, we will launch a ‘think camp’/’hackfest’, which will carry on to the next day and is aimed at developing demonstrations of hardware and software that can be used in citizen science projects or simply a concentrated discussion on a specific topic of interest.

The final day (Saturday, 22nd February 2014) will include further conference sessions, workshops and development of prototypes, with an afternoon talk, presentations and awards for the best prototypes.

Overall, we hope to cover a range of topics of relevance to citizen science research, including: technical aspects of citizen science such as use of sensors; applications of smartphones for data collection or in combination with external sensors; linking the Internet of Things (IoT) and citizen science – sensor networks to human sensors; motivations, incentives and engagement patterns; citizen science with indigenous and low-literacy communities; social science, ethnographic and anthropological aspects of citizen science and creativity and learning in citizen science.

During the summit, there will be an opportunity to present short papers, run panels, organise workshops or provide showcase demonstrations. We would like to invite anyone interested in participating in this way to submit brief proposals of up to 750 words using the form:http://bit.ly/15SWBnw

Proposals should be submitted by 31st December 2013

Registration will open in mid-December; full details will be available on our website soon:http://cybersciencesummit.org/.

We look forward to hearing from you and hope that you’ll be able to join us at the summit.

Best regards,
The Citizen Cyberscience Summit Organising Committee

Call for Papers: How do we research on climate change?

Climate Change Research Group Open Meeting: How do we do research on climate change?

Wednesday 29 January 2014, King’s College London

You are cordially invited to the 2014 Open Meeting of the Climate Change Research Group (CCRG), to be hosted by King’s College London on Wednesday 29 January 2014.

The meeting is open to all academics working within the field of climate and climate change, but is particularly aimed at PhD students, and covers all disciplines within the context of climate change, including social, political and physical science.

The title of the meeting is “How do we do research on climate change?” and will cover issues such as whether our research addresses the same goals and tackles the same climate change agenda. The meeting will include short presentations from postgraduates (focusing on methods used rather than actual findings), as well as a number of short talks and a roundtable discussion with leading academics.

In the first instance, please email Charlie Williams (C.J.R.Williams@reading.ac.uk) for a registration form. You are also warmly invited (and indeed encouraged) to submit an abstract for a short presentation along the above themes. There will be a limited amount of funding for PhD students, to cover registration and travel expenses. If you would like to apply for this, please state your reasons along on your registration form.

Please note that spaces are limited, so please email as soon as possible and by 1 December 2013 at the latest.

Call for Abstracts: How do we do research on climate change?

Climate Change Research Group Open Meeting

Wednesday 29 January 2014, King’s College London

You are cordially invited to the 2014 Open Meeting of the Climate Change Research Group (CCRG), to be hosted by King’s College London on Wednesday 29 January 2014. The meeting is open to all academics working within the field of climate and climate change, but is particularly aimed at PhD students, and covers all disciplines within the context of climate change, including social, political and physical science.

The title of the meeting is “How do we do research on climate change?” and will cover issues such as whether our research addresses the same goals and tackles the same climate change agenda. The meeting will include short presentations from postgraduates (focusing on methods used rather than actual findings), as well as a number of short talks and a roundtable discussion with leading academics.

In the first instance, please email Charlie Williams (C.J.R.Williams@reading.ac.uk) for a registration form. You are also warmly invited (and indeed encouraged) to submit an abstract for a short presentation along the above themes. There will be a limited amount of funding for PhD students, to cover registration and travel expenses. If you would like to apply for this, please state your reasons along on your registration form.

Please note that spaces are limited, so please email as soon as possible and by 1 December 2013 at the latest.

Call for Conference Papers: Rurality – New perspectives and Themes

Bamberg, Germany, 15-16th November 2013

Deadline 31st May

Profound conceptual arguments about the status of the rural have been rare in German geography: is the rural concerned with economic, population or settlement structures of particularly typify able spaces – by way of a contrast to the urban? Do semantics, ideas or discourses stand as proxies for the good, harmonious or authentic, but also oppositional themes of life? Are localised practices or lifestyles what are meant? Is the rural a selective destination for stressed city-dwellers, or a synonym for emptied regions suffering under shrinking infrastructures, poverty and the changing realities of life?

The conference has two main emphases: firstly, rurality should be conceptually observed from differentiated social space relationships. How can the term conceptual be described? What does it mean to undertake geography(ies) of rurality (and rural space)? Through which indicators can rurality be described? How does the rural reflect the dialectic of the relationship between space and society?

Secondly, empirical themes and questions relating to rural research of a social- and cultural- geographical nature emerge: where and how does rurality reveal itself as a cultural constellation, as communicated and as practiced? What role does rurality play in the context of globalisation? Which future social and political-economy processes do rural spaces enhance in order to produce a diversity of ruralities? How does the composition of rural places change? Which contributions emanate from agriculture and land speculation in creating changes to the rural?

We welcome contributions from the following research spheres:

  • History of rural geographical space/history of scientific engagement with rurality
  • Rural theories
  • Communicated rurality
  • Rural practices
  • Rurality as a cultural constellation
  • Rurality in the global context/context of globalisation
  • Rurality of migrations, emigrations and isolation
  • The rural as a resource and subject of speculation

As an international conference, the language of presentation is considered to be English. Nonetheless it is possible to give talks in German (please note your possibilities of presentation in terms of language in the abstract).

Please send an abstract (about 300 words) by the 31st May to the following email: neuelaendlichkeit@uni-mainz.de. Each presentation should be no longer than 30 minutes in length. The time could, for example, be split into 15 minutes presentation and 15 minutes discussion or 20 minutes presentation and 10 minutes discussion. Email Dan Keech for any questions on UK contributions: mdk1g09@soton.ac.uk.

 

 

Call for papers: Sustainable Transitions

RGS Planning Environment Research Group (PERG) Workshop: 25th – 26th April 2013, Exeter

This spring PERG workshop is designed to bring together those with research interests in the planning and environment field, particularly early career researchers. There is general agreement across the political divide that in the face of the important challenges of climate change and energy security, and the myriad associated economic, social, and political issues entwined with these challenges, there is a need to alter the trajectories of current sociotechnological development.

There is substantial differentiation however in relation to what particular ‘sustainable transitions’ would look like, and what policy frameworks, planning procedures, and political decisions will enable different ‘transitions’ to occur. These are central concerns for the PERG research group. Many different visions of sustainable transitions are discernible in the varied settings of the current policy landscape: in the UK context for example, there appears to be a centralisation of sustainable development policy through planning reforms such as the Planning Act 2008 and the development of National Policy Statement’s (NPS’s) as one example, whereas on the other hand, grassroots, community-led forms of transition such as Transition Towns, offer models based around different Geographical scales, technological choices, forms of public engagement, and actors involved in the transition process.

Themes for the workshop could include (but are not limited to):

• The uneven geographies of transition
• Energy choices and transition pathways
• Planning reform in a carbon constrained world
• Climate change negotiations/Geo-politics of climate change and planning
• Behavioural change and sustainable transitions
• Grassroots and community-led approaches to transition
• Sustainable development, climate change and the political
• STS and materialist approaches to sustainable transitions
• Public engagement and democratic accountability within sustainable transitions
• Household approaches to sustainable transitions
• Planning and sustainable transitions in the context of austerity.

Participants are invited to submit abstracts of no more than 250 words to either Stewart Barr (S.W.Barr@exeter.ac.uk) or Philip Johnstone (P.Johnstone@exeter.ac.uk) no later than February 15th 2013. For more details download the full Call for Papers.

 

Britain on the Move 2012

17th-18th December 2012. To be held at the RGS-IBG Headquarters, London
 
Background to the conference:
20 years ago, Champion and Fielding’s (1992) two volume edited collection on migration patterns and processes was published.  This provided a landmark intervention within migration studies and wider human geography, demonstrating how different types of migration in GB were undergoing changes and giving rise to new patterns of population, housing and economies.  For the last two decades, this book has provided a key resource for geographers and social scientists teaching the subject of migration and mobility, and scholars more widely teaching issues which inter-connect with migration and mobility.
 
This conference will review changes in GB internal migration over the past two decades, and look towards our future research and teaching agendas.
 
Full details of the conference programme can be found on the conference website here:
 
To register for the conference, please follow the link:
 
To submit academic enquiries about the conference, please contact one of the organisers:
Dr Darren P. Smith (Chair of PopGRG): D.P.Smith@lboro.ac.uk
Dr Nissa Finney (Secretary of PopGRG): nissa.finney@manchester.ac.uk
Dr Keith Halfacree (Membership Officer of PopGRG): K.H.Halfacree@swansea.ac.uk
Professor Nigel Walford (Treasurer of PopGRG): nwalford@kingston.ac.uk
 
If you are a Postgraduate Research Student and would like more information about the conference, please contact Stacey Balsdon (Secretary of PG Forum of RGS-IBG): S.L.Balsdon@lboro.ac.uk
 

Call for papers: ‘Towards Innovative Energy, Environment and Geography Teaching’

We are currently seeking abstracts for this one-day workshop, which will take place on the 13th of March 2013 at the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers) (RGS-IBG) in London. The event is being organised under the auspices of the InTreAct (Investigating REsidential and business energy consumption via student-led ACTion research) project. It is funded by the Higher Education Academy, with support from the Energy Geographies Working Group of the RGS-IBG.

The aim of the workshop is to build research capacity and provide a platform for interdisciplinary knowledge exchange, by bringing together higher education teachers who wish to share and improve their pedagogical practices in the geography, earth, and environmental sciences (GEES) domain. Paper topics can include, but are not limited to:

– Methods and techniques for active, problem-based and/or collaborative energy teaching in GEES disciplines;

– Using students as partners in GEES energy learning projects (via student-led activities and placements);

– The demand for learning energy-related issues in GEES;

– Developing innovative energy syllabi in GEES;

– Novel technologies for energy teaching in GEES (comparative opportunities, problems and strengths).

Paper abstracts of no more than 300 words should be sent to Dr Saska Petrova (s.petrova@bham.ac.uk) no later than the 20th of February 2013. Limited travel bursaries will be available. Please indicate your interest in them when sending your abstract.

UK Remote Sensing Student Conference

The UK Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry Society (RSPSoc) would like to announce an exciting upcoming event: the RSPSoc Wavelength Conference 2013 from Mon 11th – Wed 13th March 2013 in Glasgow.

This conference provides the best professional environment for interaction and networking between representatives from university and commercial workplaces, whilst still being very informal and great value. Along with presentation/poster prizes, there are three engaging keynote speakers and a fun social programme. Participation from the major universities and firms working in the field of remote sensing/photogrammetry will make this a fantastic event – so don’t miss out!

Abstract submission and registration are NOW OPEN with deadlines fast approaching. For more information please contact Andy Singleton: andy@rspsoc-wavelength.org.uk

Call for papers Economic Geography Postgraduate Conference

Economic Geography Research Group (EGRG) of the RGS-IBG
Postgraduate Conference 
Wednesday 28th November 2012
11:00-16:00
Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne
 
We welcome papers from research students on any aspect of economic geography for this annual EGRG Postgraduate Conference to be held at the Centre for Urban and Regional Development Studies (CURDS) at Newcastle University.  This one-day event will take place the day before the EGRG Annual Symposium (for which there is a separate registration if you wish to attend).
 
Please send your proposed title and your organisational affiliation to Alex Hughes (Alex.Hughes@ncl.ac.uk) no later than 14th NOVEMBER. A short abstract (of no more than 250 words) would be welcome, but is not necessary.